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JOHNS | Cornell’s Activist Myopia

Just how global is the focus of Cornell’s globalist activist community? At first glance, it is globalist without reservation: From climate crusaders demanding the University divest from fossil fuels to the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement against Israel, campus progressive activists this semester repeatedly have called for Cornell to make dramatic changes to further their political vision. Cornellians certainly have the right to petition the University, and it is understandable why they would begin their activism here. President Martha Pollack, for her part, properly noted in her response to the BDS movement that “the principal purpose of our endowment is to provide income for advancing our mission-related objectives.” The endowment, she said, “must not be viewed as a means of exercising political or social power.” That is sensible logic. Of course, this will not deter activists from their quest to politicize the University endowment.

Charlotte Brooks talking about Chinese Dual Citizenship in Goldwin Smith Hall on April 22nd, 2019.

Lecture Identifies Complex Situation of Foreign-Chinese Individuals

The Chinese government has frequently shifted its attitudes towards Chinese citizenship in the past. Now, foreign-born Chinese people by the government are seen as both an asset and a liability, said Prof. Charlotte Brooks, history, of CUNY Baruch College.

Editorial

EDITORIAL: Cornell’s Hush-Hush Huawei Ties

Thursday’s news that Cornell quietly took millions in research contracts from Chinese telecom firm Huawei is alarming enough. But the University’s refusal to provide details about said contracts makes for an utter transparency failure. Cornell must acknowledge the perils of working with a firm wedded to China’s autocracy — and reveal the nature of its Huawei ties. Public data from the Department of Education shows that Cornell took $5.3 million from Huawei in 2017 via two research contracts. That’s troubling.