LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Re: ‘The Reason for Our Silence’

To the Editor:

On Saturday, the executive board of the Cornell Republicans published a response to a column written by Andrew Lorenzen ’22 a day prior, which criticized the group’s lack of response in the wake of the murder of George Floyd. In light of the recent Black Lives Matter protests that have gripped America’s largest cities and brought issues of police brutality and racial injustice to the forefront of the media once again, we found in the group’s response little more than a vapid attempt to legitimize their continued inaction. We call here for the Cornell Republicans to publicly acknowledge that Black lives matter, and, in doing so, affirm the existence of systemic racism, institutional oppression and widespread racist police brutality. In their response meant “to set the record straight” on past silence, the Cornell Republicans reasoned that “an expression of discontent with current popular opinions, such as defunding police departments” would cause unrest in the campus political climate. However, the Cornell Republicans have previously not shied away from entertaining potentially contentious discussions – however unpopular – with little regard for the impacts they may have on campus climate.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: The Reason for Our Silence

To the Editor:

The Cornell Republicans executive board has been pained and anguished by the unjust killing of George Floyd. His death, the latest in a long series of injustices, has brought to the fore critical, and painful, conversations about police brutality and race. As the leadership of the Republican Party at Cornell, we have witnessed the intense discussion, action and outrage this tragedy has provoked. Realizing, however, that our positions might not align fully with those which have received widespread approval, we chose to take the present moment as one in which we would listen and reflect. While there are of course several policy measures we support, such as prohibiting chokeholds and reforming police unions, we thought it better to take this moment of national pain for reflection on how we can better live up to our founding ideals.

LORENZEN | The Cornell Republicans Lied to Us

In an October Letter to the Editor, the E-Board of the Cornell Republicans lied to readers of The Sun. They boldly asserted that they “are an organization that relishes the opportunity to engage in good-faith debate,” yet when the national conversation turned to police brutality and the daily endangerment of black lives by law enforcement, they stayed notably silent. Their social media makes absolutely no mention of the murder of George Floyd nor any protests. Neither does their website. They have issued no public statement on the vitally important discourse on police brutality reverberating throughout our country.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: His Record Aside, Scott Walker Is ‘Incredibly Boring’

To the Editor:

When I first learned that former Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker was visiting Cornell, I must admit, my interest was piqued. Then, I read Irene Hartmann’s grad letter, followed by the response from the Cornell Republicans. While striking, these letters do not paint a full picture of Gov. Walker, and I would encourage everyone to dig a bit deeper. For instance, while Hartmann notes that Walker attacked public-sector unions and blocked consumer protection laws, she failed to mention that Scott Walker turned down over $1 billion in federal dollars to expand Medicaid, meaning state funds were used instead. Nor did she note in her letter that Walker orchestrated the biggest corporate handout to a foreign company in American history, $4 billion, complete with the right to ignore environmental regulations, which has been disastrous.

GUEST ROOM | Stop the Silencing

Last week, I received a text containing the picture shown: An artful take on Cornell Republicans’ controversial decision to invite former Wisconsin governor Scott Walker to speak on Nov. 4. Hilarious. Let’s talk about it. Forms of expression like this have managed to poke the Big Red free-speech bear in nearly all seven of my semesters here at Cornell.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Cornell Republicans E-Board on ‘Who We Are’

.Reading Irene Hartmann’s grad letter to the editor regarding our upcoming event with former Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker on Monday, Nov. 4, we could not help but think about how Hartmann may have benefited from attending our first event of the semester with David French, then of National Review, now with The Dispatch. French spent much of his time here warning us against embracing the politics of war, enmity and assumption. It is clear that this prudent advice has not been heeded. One need only make use of the link Hartmann provided in her letter to dismiss the careless charges of defending pedophiles she leveled against Gov. Walker.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Scott Walker Embodies What the Cornell Republicans Stand For

To the Editor:

There are many reasons to oppose bringing former Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker to Cornell’s campus. From his attacks on public sector unions (while hiding behind a unionized police force) to accepting campaign donations from a lead manufacturer before then passing laws blocking families of children poisoned by lead paint from pursuing legal remedies, to helping Catholic priests who were defrocked for “substantiated cases of sexual abuse of a minor” receive or renew professional licenses that gave child molesters access to vulnerable populations, Scott Walker is the poster boy for conservatism. While some are shocked and insulted that he would be brought to campus, I am personally grateful that Cornell Republicans are publicly embracing unflinching conservatism as demonstrated by Walker. Although the talk will likely focus on anti-union rhetoric under the guise of the “free market,” there is no denying that by welcoming Walker to campus, Cornell Republicans are co-signing political patronage in the form of dark money donations and giving quarter to pedophiles instead of prosecuting them. For many of us on the left who oppose this behavior in the Democratic Party as well, it is a welcome relief that Republicans are finally willing to show the world who they are and what they stand for.