Ph.D. Fuel: What Faculty-Athletes Eat in a Day

Busy lifestyles are not uncommon among each member of Cornell’s population: a precarious everyday balance of classes, extracurriculars, social life and a structured sleep routine that can be challenging, stressful and time-consuming takes up the lives of many. On top of this, getting plenty of exercise on a regular basis and eating balanced, nutritious meals can be even harder. 

But how do our faculty — who teach thousands, lead mind-stimulating classes and are on the forefront of innovative research  — fuel their bodies and minds amid their many responsibilities and professional careers? We will take a closer look at three regular gym-goers at Cornell who prioritize the integration of eating well and being physically active into their Ph.D. lifestyles.  

Prof. Hector Aguilar-Carreno regularly works out in the gym six days per week in the early morning before work as a Professor of Virology in the College of Veterinary Medicine and has been pushing his body and mind in the weight room for 34 years. 

Upon being asked about his diet Aguilar-Carreno responded, “I do try to eat healthy [with ] … probably more protein than an average diet” that is abundant in vegetables, raw salads, fruits, nuts and Greek yogurt. 

I was also curious how Aguilar-Carreno brings his food to work. “I meal prep. I usually cook on Sundays — I do batches of food for four people in the family. I cook usually three different protein dishes, [such as]a big salmon filet [or] something with chicken or pork.

What Cornellians Eat When They Workout: Student Athlete Edition

About a month ago, I was curious about what supplements Cornell students take when they workout. I investigated, finding that the average Cornellian may use pre-workout supplements now and then, but generally does not have a strict diet or supplemental regiment when working out. This time, I wanted to dive a bit deeper into this topic. An intramural soccer champion may be a hell of an athlete, but there is a stark difference between the average intramural Cornell athlete and a Cornell D1 student athlete. I wanted to find out what goes on behind the scenes of D1 athletes.

Tea: The Key to a Healthy Brain & Healthy Body

There are a few things humans need for survival: food, water, air and shelter. As college students, we need one extra component: caffeine. Keeping up with the rigorous environment and demanding workload, sleep seems a luxurious activity to partake in. With students spending more nights at the library than in their own rooms, Cornell’s campus is bustling with students day and night. At any study space on campus, you can find scores of students with airpods in, eyes glued to laptop screens and giant cups to drink from.

SMITH | Sick

Sickness is one of the many afflictions that may strike a student and it doesn’t get a lot of sympathy. My first year, I caught the flu and developed a fever so bad it landed me in an ambulance on the way to Cayuga Med. All I remember was being grateful it happened on a Saturday, and that I was back in class the following Monday. This lack of sympathy stems from the fact that almost every student is in some stage of sickness right now, be it the “I think I’m starting to get sick” phase or the “I think I might finally be better now” phase. Mental health is a whole other can of worms. 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR | Cornell Health Needs a Gynecologist

We are 136 current and former Cornell students.  We include members of the Pelvic Pain Association of Cornell, Disability+, Graduate Women in Science, QGrads, Women’s Health Initiative, Planned Parenthood Generation Action at Cornell, [email protected], Women’s Law Coalition, and the Women of Color Collective, among others.  We include students who suffer from pelvic pain and allies of people with pelvic pain.  We are writing this letter to urge Cornell to provide funding for Cornell Health to hire an MD gynecologist. Specifically, we need a gynecologist with experience diagnosing and treating chronic vulvovaginal and pelvic pain conditions such as vulvodynia, endometriosis, PCOS, and pelvic floor dysfunction. 

BARAN | All Men Should Get Vasectomies At Birth

Intuitively, everyone would benefit from the widespread acceptance of men undergoing vasectomies before sexual maturity. Both sexes would be freer to focus on developing stable lives before even thinking about pregnancies or babies. When a couple does decide the time is right, all they would have to do is ring up a urologist. 

EPSTEIN |Get Your Daily Sun

While often associated with the transition from fall to winter, seasonal depression, also known as seasonal affective disorder or SAD, can occur at any point of seasonal change with a significant amount those affected showing symptoms during the transition from winter to spring.