RUSSELL | Hippies of Klarman

I remember the first time I saw it: I was a few steps outside my townhouse, clamoring for something spontaneous to do when, as a godsend in response to my boredom, a girl I vaguely recognized invited me to join her and her friends in a trek to the forbidden lands of a new construction site on Cornell’s campus. Under the protective veil of a late Thursday night, we slipped into the bottom floor of what would soon be my home away from home: Klarman Hall. Back then, it was just stone and sawdust. Now, Klarman is the place where I do most of my work. Whether I’m lucky enough to earn my own chair or condemned to a spot on the floor, I usually find my way to somewhere in the building after my classes during the week.

Klarman Hall Time Capsule to Commemorate Humanities in 2016

This week, the College of Arts and Sciences began accepting faculty, staff and alumni contributions to the Klarman Hall time capsule, which is scheduled to be buried during the formal dedication of Klarman Hall on May 26, according to the University. The capsule — which will be placed between Klarman Hall and Lincoln Hall — intends to encapsulate the way that students learn the humanities, according to Kathy Hovis, University writer for the College of Arts and Sciences
Submissions should answer the question, “If you could talk to a Cornell student 50 years from now, what music, movies, shows, books and art do you love today that you would want to make sure they know about? Why are these works so important to you?” according to the University. Gretchen Ritter ’83, the Harold Tanner Dean of Arts and Sciences, said that this capsule will commemorate the year 2016 as it was a particularly special year for the humanities at the University. Klarman Hall, which was completed and opened up to the public this year was “the first building dedicated to the humanities on Cornell’s central campus in 100 years,” Ritter said.