Dining Hall March Madness Matchups

The time has come. The Dining Department will be officiating our very first March Madness tournament. Witness as Cornell University’s finest eateries battle head-to-head in hopes of becoming the most popular eatery on campus. Throughout the month, we will be polling all the writers and editors of the Sunspots, Dining, Arts and Entertainment and Opinion departments. 

While many of these locations are long-time favorites, such as Trillium, and Flora Rose House, underdogs like Nasties and the hotly contested Okenshields will need to snatch a lead early on if they hope to stay in the race. Will they find the support to do so?

Odysseus Wounded: A Modern Take on a Greek Epic

At the end of The Odyssey, Odysseus finally journeys back from the fallen city of Troy to Ithaca, where he once reigned as king. Disguised, Odysseus finds his kingdom infested with once-loyal suitors competing for Odysseus’ wife’s, Penelope, hand in marriage. After skillfully shooting an arrow through twelve axes to prove his identity in a now iconic scene, Odysseus, along with his son Telemachus, in rage, proceeds to slay every single one of the suitors in barbarous fashion. The epic poem, attributed to Homer, was composed in oral tradition by a rhapsode, a classical Greek performer of epic poetry. Appropriately, the play Odysseus Wounded, by Nathan Chazan ’19, former Sun arts columnist, and Alexander Lugo ’19 was performed as a live reading.

Gluten-Free & Gothic: A Review

The food itself was surprisingly tasty and certainly masked the gluten-free, nut-free designation …. In other words, it doesn’t have to mean dry, pale, brittle cookies. And, I have to say, the meal was satisfying, even for someone who is not bound by a gluten-free diet.

Romance, Blood, Calamity: Murder Ballad at Risley

Murder Ballad (directed by Cameron Krane ’17) is just what you want out of a Friday night as Risley Theater. It’s fun and exciting, a little bit messed up, well executed and small-scale. The musical has four main characters — a woman, her two love interests and a narrator. It’s a fairly typical New York City love triangle. Sara (Ana Carpenter ’19) is stuck between the respectable NYU poet and the sketchy downtown bartender.

Preview: Spring Awakening at Risley Theatre

When I first heard about Spring Awakening, I thought of benign, sunny meadows full of blossoming flowers with some schoolchildren skipping through. Little did I know that the play is about schoolchildren’s sexual blossoming rather than their cavorting in a blooming field of flowers. I might have been far off, but the surprise made seeing the Risley Theatre production of Spring Awakening even more enjoyable. The rock musical is based on a book by Steven Sater, who also wrote the lyrics to accompany the play’s music. Set in Germany in 1891, Spring Awakening’s story is that of a group of teenagers in the midst of puberty.

Risley Theatre’s Julius Caesar: A Unique and Compelling Adaptation

Like Hemingway’s profound narrative on the destructive perplexity of war, or like Kubrick’s cinematic interpretations of subconscious struggle, Shakespeare’s tragedies possess an infinite relevance that will always characterize some portion of the human condition. Indeed, so long as individuals experience the dismay of death or the anguish of stifled romance, Shakespeare’s verse will continue to find a presence among stages and English curricula around the world. Many contemporary performances of his plays, while retaining the same lines and structure, adapt the work to a more modern setting; one notable example of this practice is Baz Luhrmann’s 1996 Romeo + Juliet, a splendid cross between sixteenth century and twentieth century 90’s culture. This is precisely the route that director Christian Brickhouse ’17 followed in Risley Theatre’s production of Julius Caesar. Rather than being left to unfold in the ancient and grand obscurity of the Roman Empire, this iteration of Julius Caesar is set in the United States during the year 1919.