Giving Day Celebration at Willard Straight Hall on March 14th, 2019.

Cornell’s Fifth Annual Giving Day Raises Close to $8 Million

In a matter of 24 hours on Thursday, the Cornell community and donors around the world raised almost $8 million dollars on Cornell’s fifth annual Giving Day, around $40,000 more than last year. The Department of Athletics and Physical Education was named the top receiver of donations this year, with gifts received totaling $2 million.

Sex on Thursday

SEX ON THURSDAY | Here’s to a Steamy Senior Spring

Editor’s Note: This piece, though new to The Sun, was originally composed in early 2018. The author has since graduated. I came to Cornell as many of you did: bright-eyed, enthusiastic and, above all else, incredibly naive. I fondly remember my first few fraternity parties, trying to look “sexy” but mostly arriving at some combination of awkward mall-dweller and short-sighted librarian while my more experienced friends guided me through the maze that would eventually become the backbone of my social life. I went through high school incredibly focused on my academics and extracurriculars, knowing that I would move on from my small town to bigger, more exciting things.

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TAARIQ | After the CALC Affair, Going Steady With Our Alma Mater

About two weeks ago, I had the opportunity to attend the 2019 Cornell Alumni Leadership Conference as a Class of 2021 Class Councils representative, alongside around 100 other current Cornell student leaders. Generations of alumni also came to the event to engage in networking and small group discussions with students. I was also present for Paul Blanchard’s ’52 acceptance speech for the William “Bill” Vanneman ’31 Outstanding Class Leader Award. When Blanchard referred to the Hall of Fame pitcher Satchel Paige as a “Negro” and said “now they call them Blacks,” my jaw dropped, followed by stifled laughter. This was the same reaction I had to his earlier comment about surveying female students on the Arts Quad.

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GUEST ROOM | Being a Cornell Alumnus Is Harder Than Being a Student

“I never threw an illegal pitch. The trouble is, once in a while I toss one that ain’t never been seen by this generation.”
—Leroy Robert “Satchel” Paige (1906-1982)
As a lifelong active Cornell alumnus who attended the Cornell Alumni Leadership Conference, I have been following The Sun’s coverage and op-ed pieces about Paul Blanchard ’52, the alumnus who gave an acceptance speech that included a description of Satchel Paige as a Negro Baseball League pitcher. The Sun’s “Mind the Gap” editorial called for “preventative measures” to avoid a recurrence of an alumni event offending student guests. Sun columnists Laura DeMassa ’21 and Canaan Delgado ’21 called for “disrupting the structural manifestations of discrimination” within Cornell’s alumni organizations. Cornell Alumni Affairs will convene a task force “of students, alumni and staff in response to the incident to ‘develop productive new ways for Cornell’s different generations to work together with even more mutual respect and understanding,’” The Sun reported.

Editorial

EDITORIAL: Mind the Gap

Generations of Cornellians came together last weekend for current students and alumni alike to enjoy an opportunity to learn from each other. There’s nothing like an invite-only potential networking opportunity to bring generations of Big Red back together. But the weekend took a turn. When Paul Blanchard ’52 was accepting the William “Bill” Vanneman ’31 Outstanding Class Leader Award, he said something so unexpected, students in attendance thought they misheard him. While talking about Satchel Paige, a Hall of Fame pitcher, he referred to the former baseballer as a “Negro,” then qualifying his statement with, “Now they call them blacks.” Cornell’s Alumni Affairs handled this situation with grace, speed, efficiency and sensitivity that many of the conference-goers commented on and appreciated.