DERY | Lowering Our Hands to Raise Our Questions

Most questions that come to mind aren’t grand or conceptual in any particular way; they arise in a much more preliminary stage of the learning process, as we try to understand the details of going from point A to B. It just wouldn’t be productive for all of our hands to shoot up when the professor asks “Any questions?”, only to go over a certain part of the lecture over again. 

YAO | Financial Literacy: It Makes Cents

Financial literacy courses shouldn’t be about selecting stocks or advanced Excel modeling, but rather about developing ways to cope with all of the money concerns that will definitely crop up much sooner than expected. There are, unfortunately, so many other ways, in addition to student loans, to get into crippling debt. The sooner we’re taught how to make informed financial decisions, the more equipped we will be to handle whatever unknowns life throws at us. 

MEHLER | The Secret of One- and Two-Credit Classes

One- and two-credit courses rarely shine on our course rosters. They are hidden in small departments, seldom publicized and most of the time fail to list who teaches the course. But, these courses remain some of the most invigorating, thought-provoking, engaging and impactful classes that most Cornellians have never even heard of. I have fortunately taken many one- and two-credit courses in my past two years here and I am here to encourage you all to do the same. 

Building Your Professional Skill Sets Through Cornell Courses

For students from non-traditional majors looking to build transferable skills for the professional workplace, choosing classes can be overwhelming. Two Cornell undergraduates and two recent graduates offered tips for ways to gain transferable skills for the workplace through Cornell’s many courses.

Cornell Cancels Classes Following Barrage of Snow

Ithaca College, Tompkins County Community College and the Ithaca County School District had canceled classes and told students to stay home, but Cornellians were still trudging up the slope to make it to classes and work for early morning classes; Cornell cancelled classes as of 10 a.m.