NGUYEN | Down With Fake Philanthropy!

I wiped graham cracker crumbs from my lips and gulped down one last gooey mouthful of marshmallow and chocolate as I traipsed down the Slope. It didn’t taste very good. I continued to distance myself from the Arts Quad on my descent to West Campus — and yet, I still couldn’t shake the saccharine aftertaste that the s’more left behind. Supposedly, I had consumed the s’more in the name of service. Realistically, my only takeaways were sticky fingers glued together by melted marshmallows and a $6 charge on my Venmo account.

From Trash to Cash: Students Scour Collegetown for Recyclables

Dented cans, plastic cups and empty bottles litter Collegetown lawns and streets each weekend, yet many of these remnants disappear before Monday classes resume. But the aftermath of Cornell’s late-night parties does not magically vanish. Beyond regularly scheduled trash collection, a number of students and campus service groups have taken up the quiet task of removing the debris scattered around Collegetown. Jacob Llodra ’21 began collecting recyclables with one of his housemates during this year’s Orientation Week. He removes bottles and cans from streets and sidewalks each week and redeems them, earning five cents for each one he processes at Wegmans.

Cornell Volunteers Travel to Colombia to Promote Higher Education in Biology

Over winter break, eight Cornell volunteers collaborated with seven students from the Universidad del Magdalena in Santa Marta, Colombia, to teach biology to Liceo Samario high school students. For some time, Prof. Timothy DeVoogd, psychology, has been trying to create international experiences for Cornell students in the sciences. He realized that one way to promote students’ international involvement might be to work with peers in Latin America over winter break. DeVoogd proposed the idea to Carlos Coronado, director of International Relations at the University of Magdalena. Coronado then found a public high school in which 80 percent of its students come from families below the Colombian poverty line, DeVoogd said.

Cornell Univ. Makes Service Honor Roll

This past week, Cornell was one of among 528 American colleges and universities to be named to the 2007 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll by The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS). This honor recognizes institutions of higher learning for their exemplary local, national and international community-service efforts.
Cornellians can be found serving communities locally, domestically and abroad — and now they are being recognized for their contributions. Students have made their mark through various events and organizations from Into the Streets held in Ithaca, as far away as the Bridges to Community in Nicaragua.