Coming Soon to Cornell Cinema: Bronx Gothic

How does a “little brown girl” feel power in a nation plagued by discrimination, privilege and bias? Bronx Gothic, which plays Wednesday at 7:15 p.m. at Cornell Cinema, follows Okwui Okpokwasili as she passionately examines this topic through drama, comedy and dance. Okpokwasili’s one-woman show follows the narrative of two young, black girls growing up in the Bronx, one innocent and the other’s life marked by sexual violence and abuse, who communicate on a deeply personal level through the passing of notes. For the first thirty minutes of the stage version of Bronx Gothic, Okpokwasili simply vibrates in the corner of the stage with the hope that people will be forced to stop asking what is going on and tune in to the frequency that she is emitting. The remainder of her narrative is laid out as a crude series of letters depicting a friendship’s rise and fall, sex, and bias, paired with movements that, at times, bring Okpokwasili to the stage floor.

Shall We Dance? Yes, but not Around Colonialism

As a longtime Zadie Smith fan, I began my journey into Swing Time, her latest novel, with a certain degree of expectation. I anticipated to be entertained, that there would be points where I laughed and, as a testament to the complexity of her writing, for there also to be moments in the book when I cried. I did not however, expect to feel intense irritation, almost to the point of hatred. The plot of Swing Time is effectively split into two. The first revolves around the childhood friendship of two girls tied together by their similar skin tones and mutual love of dance.

Dancers Perform Choreography Exploring the Urchin

Seven dancers explore the concept of empathy with everyday objects in a performance surrounding the Urchin, an installation on the Arts Quad. Fugitive Spaces was choreographed by Jumay Chu, a senior lecturer in Performing and Media Arts, as a part of the Cornell Council for the Arts 2016 biennial, titled “Abject/Object Empathies.”

Cornell to Host First Ivy League Dance Marathon

Barton Hall will transform into a dance floor on Nov. 7 to host the Ivy League’s first dance marathon, Big Red Thon. About 500 Cornellians have signed up to dance continuously for 13 hours — from Saturday through Sunday — raising nearly $15,000 out of their $50,000 goal as of Monday evening for Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Chelsea Assang ’16, dance and morale captain of Big Red Thon, said the dance marathon will be divided into different dance themes. “[There will be a] hip hop hour, a rave hour [and] a Zumba hour to keep it very versatile so it appeals to a wider population,” Assang said.