SUPER-BOWL-Michelle-Gustafson-_-The-New-York-Times

What Kicks Off at Kickoff? The Science and Risks of Being a Superfan

It is no surprise that playing football can be dangerous; however, studies show that merely being a fan of football can also pose some serious risks. While many hail Super Bowl Sunday as a national holiday, evidence suggests that it is one of the unhealthiest days of the year. Football, one of the most followed sports in America, has some pretty serious fans — the Facebook presence of the NFL alone has over 17.2 million followers. Just last year, the championship game was broadcasted to over 103 million viewers. But the dramatic fluctuations from the victorious highs to the defeating, anxiety-ridden lows can take a toll on one’s body.

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KANKANHALLI | Why the Super Bowl?

You’re told to write about what you know — with good reason, in order to avoid assuming the likeness of a total dud and expounding on topics that are far beyond your expertise. Today, though, decorum begs to be broken as I attempt to comprehend the national spectacle that is the Super Bowl. Powerful enough to coax a purr out of President Donald J. Trump, Super Bowl LII transported us to an alternate universe where viewers’ pride and happiness are inextricably linked to the wins of their athletic counterparts. [Spoiler Alert] “Congratulations to the Philadelphia Eagles on a great Super Bowl victory!” — a tweet posted last night from Trump’s own account, staggering and confounding in its authenticity, begins to capture the scope of this annual match. Such a priority is the occasion, in fact, that previous commitments are rescheduled and responsibilities are dismissed for a fateful few hours.

Rejected Superbowl Ads: How YouTube is Changing the World

It used to be that you had to get media corporations on your side to get worldwide attention. Not anymore. If the news about this year’s Super Bowl commercials are any indicator, we may be moving into an age where virtual marketing may not only be cheaper, it’s more effective as well.

By ads, I mean the ones that didn’t make it to air, but are now floating around on the Internet for all to see.

Consider the latest PETA commercial, which NBC refused to let air during the Super Bowl because it “depicts a level of sexuality exceeding our standards”, according to Victoria Morgan, NBC Universal’s advertising standards executive.