Harvesting carrots at a Community Supported Agriculture plot. (Brianna Johnson / Sun Contributor)

Racial & Food Justice — A Resource

As the murder of George Floyd has shocked the nation into protest and the realities of systemic racism are further exposed, it is important to consider just how deeply this racism permeates. As the farmers market pavilion in Ithaca opens for its 46th year and many home gardens in the upstate region finally begin to flourish after a long winter’s frost, it is incredibly important to consider the intersection of food and racial justice. Our country was founded on colonialism and inequality. These same inequalities proliferate into our current food system, creating vast disparities in access to food and land. As a growing number of movements seek to dismantle our current food system in hopes of erecting one founded on principles of sustainability, health and justice, we must also acknowledge that food justice is racial justice.

Professor Joseph Margulies gives a lecture on incarceration on September 26, 2019.

‘Rethinking Violence’ Lecture Urges Students to Question Approach to Violent Crime

“The essence of the criminal justice reform model in the popular press has focused on the lowest of the low hanging fruit — the nonviolent drug offender in prison for possession of controlled substances,” Prof. Joseph Margulies, government, law, said in a lecture Thursday afternoon. But, according to Margulies, this narrative often embraced by the media is wrong. Margulies is a self-described “student of the American criminal justice system,” according to his bio on the Cornell Law School website. He has defended numerous people “caught up in the excesses of the so-called war on terror,” such as Abu Zubaydah — a Saudian Arabian national held at CIA black sites and interrogated in 2002 and 2003, the public discovery of which led to the infamous Bush Administration “torture memos.”

He disputed the popularly-held notion that the United States incarcerates large numbers of low-level non-violent offenders for minor possession charges and sentences them to disproportionate sentences — calling that perception the “holy grail” of incarceration. “We don’t send those people to prison … the search for the low-level non-violent drug offender is like the hunt for a snark …They may exist but they are vanishingly rare,” he said.

Quote Block Templates (2)

SULLIVAN BAKER | To Get the Most out of Cornell, Build Something Here

A few nights ago, after a long day of Cornell Political Union recruitment, we collapsed into a Collegetown establishment’s rickety chairs, ordered heaps of greasy food and became embroiled in a heated discussion. One of our executive board members, a sophomore with a promising future in the organization, had asked if she should study abroad, and our table was split. But our conversation wasn’t actually about studying abroad. The executive board member had really asked, “Should I commit to campus service for my entire college career? Is it worth it?”

My answer was a resounding yes, but only because she has the right attitude toward campus engagement, one too rare on a campus where “leadership” is an expectation but thoughtful, deliberate engagement is optional.

pasted image 0

Big Red Hacking For a 5th Year and Beyond!

Sixty-seven teams representing Cornell and other universities such as Princeton and Binghamton came together to brainstorm and develop projects ranging from website applications to hardware prototypes that centered around this year’s theme of “Community Superheros.”

Students held a vigil to honor the victims of the attacks in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday.

Students Stand Vigil In Honor of Victims of the Easter Sunday Sri Lanka Attacks

As the wind gently blew across Ho Plaza on Wednesday, it carried the voices of people sharing their connections to Sri Lanka and the people whose lives were lost on Easter Sunday. Students from all different backgrounds, ages and disciplines faced each other in a wide circle, candles given out by the organizers in hand.