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Art in the Time of Crisis

While we settle in and practice social distancing, we’re going to have more time than ever to lock into our favorite entertainment and provide you with more things to do and enjoy besides Office reruns and stale memes about Zoom lectures.

Guest Room

GUEST ROOM | Valuing Our Interdisciplinary Programs

I believe deeply in the value of these programs. As research enterprises and educational units, these programs greatly enrich the College of Arts & Sciences. In the context of the curriculum review we are currently endeavoring in the college, our faculty have affirmed the value of such considerations with the proposal to add a “human difference” category to the breadth requirements. If we are to prepare our students to be good global citizens and navigate an increasingly heterogeneous world, then we must prepare them to understand how social categories are created, and the implications that this has for our society more broadly.

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Holy Split, Signs of M. Night Shyamalan’s Return Are Happening

Director M. Night Shyamalan gets a lot of crap, and rightfully so. Until his most recent outing, Split, he hadn’t made a good movie in more than a decade. After Earth was bad. The Happening was so bad that it was funny. The Last Airbender was so far down the scale of badness that it was no longer eligible to be funny.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CORNELL COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS

Art You’re a Part of: Polyphony at the John Hartell Gallery

Underneath the Sibley dome, adjacent to the College of Architecture, Art and Planning Dean’s Office, is Polyphony. It is an interactive art installation designed by Liu (Leo) Jingyang ’15, Shining (Christina) Sun ’17 and Yue Gu ’16 — all current or former architecture students. To say that the project sounds interesting — “an interactive audio-visual installation that generates a simultaneous feedback loop between performance, image and sound” — is to say little about the installation. Yet, how does it actually look, sound and perform? The first time I entered the John Hartell Gallery (where Polyphony is installed), I sensed that something was wrong.